Moroccan Cuisine

Moroccan Cuisine
For the adventurous eater, Morocco has some exciting dishes like camel burgers and snail soup. For me, I stuck with the basics.

Mint Tea
No matter where you go in Morocco, you’ll undoubtedly be served mint tea—boiling hot, very sweet, and served in a glass. Your server may even hold the pot high above the glass while pouring, as tea is considered an art form.

Kebabs
Another staple is kebabs—chicken, beef or lamb—made with a unique blend of spices that give them an authentic Moroccan taste. The kebabs I ordered were always served with French fries. Perhaps this is just how they serve them to tourist, but I’m not complaining.

Pastilla
In Fes, I was advised to try the pastilla—a sweet and savory pigeon pie topped with cinnamon and sugar (though chicken is now commonly used). My advice? Go for it. It was the best thing I ate in Morocco!

Couscous
Topped with stewed meat or vegetables, a plate of these tiny, fluffy pasta balls is filling, inexpensive and delicious.

Tajine
Meat or vegetables are slow cooked in clay pots (called tajines) and served with bread or couscous. Each tajine dish I tried was different. One had root vegetables with raisins and chickpeas; another had cauliflower, tomatoes and olives. There was only one I didn’t enjoy: an oily meat tajine with no vegetables.

Moroccan Soup
Harira, called Moroccan Soup on most menus, is a mild, tomato based soup with perfectly blended spices—I couldn’t identify any individual seasonings. Each bowl was slightly different than the next, but it was delicious every time.

Orange Juice
One stroll through the Jemaa el Fna and you’ll see that orange juice is the pride of Morocco. And surprisingly, it really is the best orange juice I’ve ever had.

Seasoned Olives
I ate olives every day in Morocco. My favorite ones were seasoned with lemons and served in a spicy salsa.

Copyright © 2016 Fortuitous Travel. All rights reserved.

Mint tea
Mint tea
Mint tea
Mint tea
Mint tea
Mint tea
Pastilla
Pastilla
Pastilla
Pastilla
Kebabs with fries
Tajine
Tajine
Tajine with raisins
Tajine with couscous
Moroccan soup
Moroccan soup
Moroccan breakfast
Lemon olives

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